Additional sentencing, plea deals, and charges in college admissions scandal

October 28, 2019, 8:39 am

Entrance to the University of Southern California. Image courtesy of Adobe Stock.

In the last week and a half, there have been two more parents sentenced with four entering plea deals.  Additional charges have been brought against parents who are still fighting the charges.

One parent released

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Six more parents sentenced in “Varsity Blues” admissions scandal.

October 17, 2019, 4:04 pm

Residence of Felicity Huffman for the next 14 days: Federal Correctional Institution_Dublin California Overhead View by Prison Insight is licensed under CC BY 2.0

That makes #4 through #9 that have been sentenced.

First of the parents has reported for her free federal housing.

Other articles:

10/15/19 – NPR – Felicity Huffman Begins 14-Day Prison Term in College Admissions Scandal – She reported early for her 14 day sentence.

On 10/16/19, the Bureau of Prisons Inmate Locator website shows her with register 77806-112, located at Dublin FCI, with release date of 10/27/19.  That means she would have actually reported on 10/13/19, I think.  Dublin FCI is low security federal institution with an adjacent low security satellite camp. It is located in Alameda county, California.  See overhead photo above.

10/15/19 – Wall Street Journal – In College-Admissions Case, Lawyers for Coaches, Others Move to Dismiss Charges – A number of parents are filing motions that the conspiracy charges are cast too wide, including parents who weren’t participating with anyone, thus the charges are more severe than they ought to be. I don’t understand the purpose of the argument, but appears to be effort to separate some of the less-involved parents from the taint of being publicly associated with the more severe cases.

Details of sentencing

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Second and third parent sentenced in “Varsity Blues” admissions scandal.

September 26, 2019, 11:17 am

Image courtesy of Adobe Stock.

Two more parents have been sentenced in the admissions scheming. Also, the judge handling 10 plea deals outlines the rationale for sentencing.

Los Angeles Times – 9/23/19 – Prosecutors in college admissions scandal fighting for prison time for parents. The judge scheduled to sentence 10 more parents in the “Varsity Blues” admissions fiasco decided on the basis for which she will determine sentences.  Prosecutors had sought to use the amount of money paid as guiding the sentence. Judge decided the actions of the parents will guide her sentencing.

Two new sentencings

9/27/19 – Stephen Semprevivo – Sentenced to 4 months in jail, 2 years supervised release, 500 hours community service, $100,000 fine, possible restitution to Georgetown. He allegedly paid $400,000 to the fake charity, which in turn allegedly paid the Georgetown tennis coach. Plan was to present the son as a competitive tennis player.

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Admissions scandal sentencing. Data base on accused parents.

September 19, 2019, 7:29 am

USC library. USC is the most popular school for those accused in the Varsity Blues scandal. Image courtesy of Adobe Stock.

A second sentence has been handed down in the “Varsity Blues” college-admissions scandal. I’ll make a completely wild guess on what the sentencing might hint for others facing sentencing or trial. Another parent has been charged.

Finally, link to a database from Wikipedia of the accused parents, their background, number of children involved, and name of school.

Of note to readers of this blog is that I’ve not seen any comments that  implicate any of the schools beyond some of their staff doing under the table deals.

7/9/19 – Stanford sailing coach – Sentenced to 1 day in jail, 6 months house detention, 2 years supervised release, and $10K fine. Prosecution sought 1 year. This is described as the least severe of the cases since the coach didn’t receive any money directly and only one student was admitted.

9/13/19 – Felicity Huffman – Sentenced to 14 days in jail, yes 14 days, one year supervised release, 250 hours community service and $30,000 fine. Prosecutors asked for 30 days, one year supervised release, and $20K fine.

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Looks like the scope of the guardianship-transfer-for-financial-aid fiasco is growing

August 12, 2019, 1:11 pm

Image courtesy of Adobe Stock.

The first reports of a new college admissions scandal indicated the scheme was in play in Illinois. A small number of minutes research on the ol’ net shows the scandal is now open in Missouri.

With a sinking feeling, I am wondering where else this will show itself.

Scheme reportedly exists in Missouri

Kansas City Star – 8/5/19 – Did rich Missouri families give up custody of kids to get college aid? How’s that legal? Cases have been found of families in Missouri transferring guardianship of children in order to get financial aid.

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College admissions scandal update and freshly reported financial-aid scheme remind me of a verse from Jeremiah about the deceitfulness of the human heart.

July 30, 2019, 6:30 am

Image courtesy of Adobe Stock.

At a status conference update for the college admissions scandal, the prosecutors said they have turned over about 3 million pages of documents to the attorneys for the 19 defendants still fighting the charges. This includes around a million pages of emails and 4,500 phone conversations which were wiretapped.

Several attorneys claim they want to see all the FBI interview forms (those infamous 302s, which are subsequently prepared notes of interviews documented at some various time after the interview) for all of the people *not* charged in the investigation. The claim is there is exculpatory evidence somewhere in the 302s. The judge denied that request for the moment.

For more info, check out USA Today on 6/3/19: College admissions scandal:  Parents say payments to ringleader weren’t bribes. Next status conference is on October 1.

Another scheme

Financial aid calculations are based on family income and assets.  If a student is assessed as ‘independent’ only the student’s income and assets enter the calculation.

So, how do you get mom’s and dad’s high income and very expensive house removed from the calculation so the student gets a bunch more assistance?

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Sad as it is to read about, leaders in the Christian community need to be aware of what happened at Willow Creek Community Church.

July 25, 2019, 9:16 am

What can we learn from this mess? Image courtesy of Adobe Stock.

Anyone who has been an adult a few years or has read news for more than , oh a few weeks, knows there is massive ugliness in the world.

Anyone who has been in leadership of a church or ministry for more than a few months knows the ugliness we see in the world is also present in the community of believers.

Why read about and then study messiness?

There are several disasters in the Christian community at the moment which leaders should pay attention to.

Why?

So we can learn. By observing we can be better prepared for dealing with horrible things if (or rather when) they appear in our area of responsibility.

In my professional role as auditor over the last few decades I have observed moral failure of leaders, embezzlement, fraudulent financial misstatements, tax fraud, and sundry other unpleasantness. (Okay, okay, sin is the correct description of those things.)

Because of confidentiality requirements, I cannot discuss anything about any of those issues.

Current, public issues are a different story. Having no connection to those incidents frees me to discuss them.

Willow Creek Community Church

A major scandal has been in the news at Willow Creek for over a year. Here is a tour of some articles which can fill you in.

What can you learn as a leader from this fiasco?

3/22/18 – Christianity Today – Bill Hybels Accused of Sexual Misconduct by Former Willow Creek Leaders. Article summarizes a range of allegations that had surfaced over the previous five years, including stories of decades old misbehaviors.

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